Leuven MindGate Discovery Panels

The following inventions were all made in Leuven and can be found among the Leuven streets. Discovery all twelve success stories of Leuven MindGate.

Creativity from Leuven makes Belgian Red Devils hot again

Devil's Challenges, conceived and developed by Leuven-based full-service agency Boondoggle, brought the Devils' popularity to unseen heights.

Location > City Hall
On the corner of Grote Markt and Naamsestraat

After 10 meager years for the Belgian Red Devils, the Belgian Football Association asked Boondoggle to close the gap which had developed between the team and the fans. The qualifying campaign for the 2014 World Cup was coming and Belgium's fans would accept no less other than the direct qualification of their 'Golden Generation'.

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Ultra strong and Ultra light suitcases

A KU Leuven research project in cooperation with Samsonite results in the world's best selling line of suitcases.

Location > Ladeuzeplein
Right next to the Hooverplein

A few years ago, Samsonite and Professor Ignaas Verpoest of the KU Leuven Departement of Materials Engineering cooperated in order to reinforce the 'CURV' material to create lighter and more solid suitcases. In 2009, Samsonite launched the Cosmolite model that, up to this day, was sold more than 2 million times. 

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Shoes from Leuven which require no cleaning

Nanotechnology makes elegant and exclusive women's shoes water- and dirt repellent.

Location > M-Museum
Leopold Vanderkelenstraat 4

Elegnano designs shoes using nanotechnology. The leather surface contains tiny rods which block water or dirt and allow it to roll off in tiny balls. This technique was inspired by lotus flowers, who still look perfectly white in the most muddy environments.

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The most widely used anti-HIV medicine worldwide

ANTI-HIV MEDICATION LOWERS HIV-LEVELS IN THE BLOOD, MAKING THE INFECTION NO LONGER LETHAL.

Location > Auditorium Pieter De Somer
Charles Deberiotstraat 24

In 1993, professor Erik De Clercq and professor Jan Balzarini of KU Leuven's Rega Institute, discovered the healing effect Tenofovir had on HIV. Together with the American bio-pharmaceutical company Gilead Sciences, the medicine was further developed under the name Viread. Today, Viread is the most widely used anti-HIV medicine worldwide.

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Rice with a shorter cooking time but higher nutritional value

Research carried out by KU Leuven gives insight in Uncle Ben's Long Grain Parboiled rice's cooking time and nutritional characteristics.

Locatie > Groot Begijnhof
Schapenstraat at house number 97

In 2001, professor Jan Delcour and his team at KU Leuven's Laboratory of Food Chemistry and Biochemistry conducted research to improve Uncle Ben's long grain parboiled rice. The research was conducted by and for MARS NV from Olen, Belgium.

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Television from Leuven

TV-CHEF JEROEN MEUS SHOWS WHAT TO COOK IN AWARD-WINNING TV-SHOW DAGELIJKSE KOST, breaks all records by doing so.

Location > Martelarenplein

Leuven-based TV-production company Hotel Hungaria replaced the usual TV-chef in his white apron by the guy next door, literally! Leuvenite Jeroen Meus was the ideal person to put behind the stove in a kitchen where everybody could walk past and have a look through the window to witness it all while being aired. The concept turned out to be a successful recipe.

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New apple varieties

More resistant, nicer colour, better flavour and longer shelf-life. Better3Fruit develops tomorrow's top fruits.

Location > OPEK
Vaartkom

Better3Fruit 'designs' new and better fruit, complying to both the consumer and industry's wishes. Their most famous creation is the Kanzi apple, an apple with a distinctive shine, flavour and shelf-life. Even at colder temperatures, its trees still offer a profitable harvest. This made the Kanzi one of the farmers favorites across all of Europe. 

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A 3D printed artificial eye

Eye Specialists at University Hospital Leuven succeeded in creating a tailor-made artificial eye in collaboration with Leuven-based 3D Printing pioneer Materialise.

Location > International House
Tiensevest 60

The big difference with traditional artificial eyes, which are made using a hand-made mold, is that a 3D-printed eye looks a lot more like the real thing and above all fits better in the eye cavity. Leuven University Hospital used the 3D printed eye for a 68 year-old man and further adjustments were not required.

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COCHLEAIR TECHNOLOGY HELPING THE DEAF

A COLLABORATION BETWEEN THE UNIVERSITY OF LEUVEN, IMEC AND COCHLEAR LTD.

Location > Vismarkt

The research aims to improve how hearing signals are processed.This makes it possible to filter out noise, allowing a better perception of speech and music. Also the stimulation of the hearing nerve, the development of testing platforms and a better perception when it comes to sound direction are being developed.

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High-Tech for the blind

A blind patient can read again. The breakthrough happened at Leuven University Hospital, thanks to a robot, an ultra thin needle and a medicine made by Leuven-based Thrombogenics.

Location > Kruidtuin
Kapucijnenvoer 30

A patient suffering from a blood clot in a retinal blood vessel successfully underwent surgery done by a robot, constructed by researchers from Leuven. The technology offers a cheaper solution to 16 million people worldwide who suffer from Retinal Vein Occlusion.

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The world's largest collection of bananas

THE UNIVERSITY OF LEUVEN USES SPECIAL TECHNIQUES TO PRESERVE OVER 1 500 DIFFERENT VARIETIES OF BANANAS.

Location > Abdij Van 't Park
Heverlee

KU Leuven's banana gene pool safely houses over 1500 species of banana. It collects information on every kind, improves diversity and its usage to keep all species alive for the sake of future generations. Bananas are a staple crop for more than one third of the world population and are constantly under threat of diseases and deforestation.

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COMPUTER ELECTRONICS MAKING PLAYING CARDS COOL AGAIN

RAZOR-THIN COMPUTER COMPONENTS IN PLAYING CARDS CREATE ENDLESS INTERACTIVE POSSIBILITIES.

Location > To be confirmed

Imec and Belgium-based Cartamundi developed a chip so thin and flexible that it can be put in playing cards. These characteristics originate from a technology already used by imec: the chips are no longer made of silicium on a classic circuit board, but are made of metal oxide and put on a thin plastic film.

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